Blog

Senior Woman and Her Caretaker Laughing

Caring Child or Calculating Caretaker?

Senior Woman and Her Caretaker Laughing

As parents age and their physical and mental capacities diminish, their adult children will often step in to provide care. One child may take over the majority of day-to-day responsibilities, including things like facilitating appointment with doctors and attorneys. As this continues to happen, the parent increasingly depends on that child, and it can make sense to appoint that child as a trusted decision maker and to even give them
READ MORE

How Will Getting a Divorce Affect My Estate Planning

Getting a divorce is never an easy process; it is emotional and stressful for all involved. For younger couples, children and family estate planning are likely a top concern. For older couples, long-term care, retirement plans, and inherited assets may be more significant concerns to think about. Keep reading for some things to consider about divorce and estate planning if you are ending a long-term marriage.   Asset Division Dividing
READ MORE

When is Guardianship of an Elderly Parent Needed?

When people think of guardianship, they often think about a minor child in the care of a designated adult family member or friend, or perhaps a disabled adult child who needs care after turning 18. However, guardianship of an elderly or aging adult, usually a parent, who is losing their physical and mental health capacities is also fairly common. While the process is similar, there are some distinct differences when
READ MORE

Estate Planning or Elder Law: What do You Need?

As you get older and begin to plan for living life in retirement, you may hear the terms “estate planning” and “elder law” brought up regularly. There are some clear differences between estate planning and elder law, but they also have some important similarities. Even though these two types of law are technically utilized for two different stages in life, elder law and estate planning are often handled at the
READ MORE

Can My Trust Own My Business After Death?

The answer to the title question depends on a few factors, but, in general, yes —your trust can own your business after you die. There are several factors to consider, including the type of business and the type of trust. Is your business a limited liability company (LLC), a partnership, a corporation, or a sole proprietorship? Another consideration is how your business is managed; is your business managed as an
READ MORE

What to Do if a Family Member Dies Without a Will

Estate planning is an important process that includes setting up trusts, wills, and POAs. No matter your age or asset level, having a will is beneficial. According to a recent survey, nearly 33 percent of Americans have no estate plan at all, and that includes a basic will. With over 1/3rd of the country unprepared, it is likely that you have a parent or family member who will die without
READ MORE

Signs of Elder Financial Fraud and Elder Abuse

Elder financial fraud and elder abuse and two important topics that are important to discuss and be aware of as we age.  We like to think that these issues won’t hit us or our loved ones, but elder abuse is much more common than many people realize. According to the World Health Organization, around 1 in 6 people 60 years and older have experienced some form of abuse in the
READ MORE

Estate Planning and Couples with an Age Gap

For couples who get together and are of similar ages, planning for the future is usually a joint effort. Couples who have a significant age gap may have different plans for the future, however. If you are married to someone who is significantly older or younger than you, the future may look different and require different types of planning. To protect yourself, your spouse, and other loved ones in your
READ MORE

Revocable Trusts versus Irrevocable Trusts: What’s Right For You

There are many different types of trusts for estate planning purposes. The most common trust types are revocable and irrevocable trusts, and many people wonder if they need one or both to be protected. While there are some similar features, these two major categories of trusts carry different purposes in your estate plan. Both can substitute for a last will and testament as an alternative way to distribute property, though
READ MORE

Reduce Your Risk of Probate Litigation

There are many family circumstances that can increase the risk of probate litigation when someone passes. They all come down to basically the same fight: families disagreeing on how to handle the estate of a loved one who dies. High-risk factors that often bring about probate litigation can include sibling rivalry, a large estate, second marriages with no prenuptial agreement, a dysfunctional family, and a non-standard (or non-existent) estate plan.
READ MORE

Blog Categories

Blog Archives

Blog Tags

(725) 999-1707